Georgian National Academy of Sciences (GNAS)

Georgian National Academy of Sciences is successor to the
Georgian Academy of Sciences (GAS).

 

The Georgian National Academy of Sciences coordinates scientific research in Georgia and develops relationships with the Academies of foreign countries and other scientific centers (see the Law and the Statute of GNAS).

GNAS consists of  Full Members (Academicians), Corresponding Members, and Foreign Members of the Academy. His Holiness Ilia II – Katholikos-Patriarch of All Georgia – is Honorary Academician of GNAS (s. the link to the Ceremony).

The Georgian National Academy of Sciences develops rich cultural and scientific traditions which the Georgian nation created in the course of centuries.

 Many centuries ago outstanding Georgian scholars made brilliant translations and created original works in educational and scientific centers of those times, such as the School of philosophy and rhetoric in Colchis  (4th c.), the Centers of spiritual culture in Palestine (5th c.), Syria (6th c.), Greece (10th  –  15th cc.) and Bulgaria (11thc.,) as well as Academies of Gelati and Iqalto (12th c.) in Georgia. Founded by the Georgian King David the Builder, the Gelati Academy that was called “New Athens and a Second Jerusalem”, should be considered one of the oldest Scientific-Educational Institutions in Europe.

Medieval Georgia was distinguished by the high level of development in philosophy, historiography, poetics, arts (especially handicraft and national architecture), theology, law and legislation, astronomy, geography, medicine, and other fields of science. This is confirmed by the unique manuscripts of ancient Georgian and foreign authors, by the rich cultural heritage of the Georgian people.

As early as the first half of the 5th century, a magnificent monument of Georgian literature "The Martyrdom of St.Shushanic" by Jacob Tsurtaveli was created, and the genuine peak of development of Medieval public thought is represented by the epic poem "The Knight in the Panther's Skin" by Shota Rustaveli. The latter is a convincing proof of many-sided and profound knowledge accumulated by that time in Georgia in the sphere of humanities and natural sciences.

The Georgian Academy of Sciences, as an organized form of uniting Georgian scientists, was established in February 1941. The direct predecessors of the Academy, preparing grounds for its establishment, were the Georgian branch of the All-Union Academy of Sciences and the Tbilisi State University, where a number of research institutions and scientific centers were created in the 20-s and 30-s of the past century.

The first sixteen elected members of the Georgian Academy of Sciences worked in two Departments: the Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, and the Department of Social Sciences.

King David the Builder

The Founders of the Academy are Academicians:

  • Giorgi Akhvlediani (Linguistics)
  • Ivane Beritashvili (Physiology)
  • Arnold Chikobava (Linguistics)
  • Giorgi Chubinashvili (Arts)
  • Simon Djanashia (History)
  • Aleksandre Djanelidze (Geology)
  • Korneli Kekelidze (Philology)
  • Nikoloz Ketskhoveli (Botany)
  • Tarasi Kvaratskhelia (Subtropical Cultures)
  • Giorgi Khachapuridze (History)
  • Nikoloz Muskhelishvili (Mathematics, Mechanics)
  • Akaki Shanidze (Linguistics)
  • Aleksandre Tvalchrelidze (Mineralogy, Petrography)
  • Dimitri Uznadze (Psychology)
  • Kiriak Zavriev (Constructive Mechanics)
  • Pilipe Zaitsev (Zoology)
 

Shota Rustaveli

A Group of the Academy Founding Members

 Academician Nikoloz Muskhelishvili was elected First President of the Georgian Academy of Sciences. He was at the head of the Academy for more than thirty years (1941-1972). In 1972-1977 President of the Academy was Academician Ilia Vekua, in 1978-1986 – Academician Evgeni Kharadze, in 1986-2005 – Academician Albert Tavkhelidze; since 2005 Academician Tamaz (Thomas V.) Gamkrelidze is at the head of the Georgian National Academy of Sciences.